Revenge & You

godsgonnacutyoudown:


bitterloveandsweethate:

handpickedhappiness:

kenneth-munster:

This is the best thing I have ever seen!!

FUCKIT’S BACK!

OHMY.

IM SO HAPPY ITS BACK.

godsgonnacutyoudown:

bitterloveandsweethate:

handpickedhappiness:

kenneth-munster:

This is the best thing I have ever seen!!

FUCK
IT’S BACK!

OHMY.

IM SO HAPPY ITS BACK.

(Source: derpygrooves, via whotrekkie)

— 2 days ago with 147120 notes
currentsinbiology:

Ketamine can be a wonder drug for ER patients
For critically ill patients arriving at the emergency department, the drug ketamine can safely provide analgesia, sedation and amnesia for rapid, life-saving intubation, despite decades-old studies that suggested it raised intracranial pressure. The results of a systematic review of 10 recent studies of what many emergency physicians regard as a “wonder drug” are published online in Annals of Emergency Medicine.




"Apprehension for many years about ketamine’s effects on blood pressure or injured brains inhibited its use for intubation, especially in North America compared to Europe, but our review shows those concerns are likely overblown," said lead study author Corinne Hohl, MD, of the Department of Emergency Medicine at Vancouver General Hospital in Vancouver, Canada. "In view of recent concerns about the potential negative effects of an alternative induction agent, etomidate, ketamine should be considered routinely in patients with life-threatening infections and more regularly for patients who have been ‘found down,’ or unconscious, before being transported to the ER."

Lindsay Cohen, Valerie Athaide, Maeve E. Wickham, Mary M. Doyle-Waters, Nicholas G.W. Rose, Corinne M. Hohl. The Effect of Ketamine on Intracranial and Cerebral Perfusion Pressure and Health Outcomes: A Systematic Review. Annals of Emergency Medicine, 2014; DOI: 10.1016/j.annemergmed.2014.06.018

currentsinbiology:

Ketamine can be a wonder drug for ER patients

For critically ill patients arriving at the emergency department, the drug ketamine can safely provide analgesia, sedation and amnesia for rapid, life-saving intubation, despite decades-old studies that suggested it raised intracranial pressure. The results of a systematic review of 10 recent studies of what many emergency physicians regard as a “wonder drug” are published online in Annals of Emergency Medicine.

"Apprehension for many years about ketamine’s effects on blood pressure or injured brains inhibited its use for intubation, especially in North America compared to Europe, but our review shows those concerns are likely overblown," said lead study author Corinne Hohl, MD, of the Department of Emergency Medicine at Vancouver General Hospital in Vancouver, Canada. "In view of recent concerns about the potential negative effects of an alternative induction agent, etomidate, ketamine should be considered routinely in patients with life-threatening infections and more regularly for patients who have been ‘found down,’ or unconscious, before being transported to the ER."

Lindsay Cohen, Valerie Athaide, Maeve E. Wickham, Mary M. Doyle-Waters, Nicholas G.W. Rose, Corinne M. Hohl. The Effect of Ketamine on Intracranial and Cerebral Perfusion Pressure and Health Outcomes: A Systematic Review. Annals of Emergency Medicine, 2014; DOI: 10.1016/j.annemergmed.2014.06.018

(via we-are-star-stuff)

— 2 days ago with 749 notes
thepeoplesrecord:

NYC approves apartment building with separate entrance for the poorJuly 23, 2014
It would be difficult to come with a more on-the-nose metaphor for New York City’s income inequality problem than the new high-rise apartment building coming to 40 Riverside Boulevard, which will feature separate doors for regular, wealthy humans and whatever you call the scum that rents affordable housing.
Extell Development Company, the firm behind the new building, announced its intentions to segregate the rich and poor to much outrage last year. Fifty-five of the luxury complex’s 219 units would be marked for low-income renters—netting some valuable tax breaks for Extell—with the caveat that the less fortunate tenants would stick to their own entrance.


The city’s Department of Housing Preservation and Development approved Extell’s Inclusionary Housing Program application for the 33-story tower this week, the New York Post reports. The status grants Extell the aforementioned tax breaks and the right to construct a larger building than would ordinarily be allowed. According to the Daily Mail, affordable housing tenants will enter through a door situated on a “back alley.”


Any of the unwashed folk who complain about such a convenient arrangement, of course, are just being ungrateful. As the Mail points out, fellow poor-door developer David Von Spreckelsenexplained as much last year:

"No one ever said that the goal was full integration of these populations," said David Von Spreckelsen, senior vice president at Toll Brothers. "So now you have politicians talking about that, saying how horrible those back doors are. I think it’s unfair to expect very high-income homeowners who paid a fortune to live in their building to have to be in the same boat as low-income renters, who are very fortunate to live in a new building in a great neighborhood."

In these economically fraught times, it’s easy to forget that the super rich earned their right to never see you, hear you, smell you, or consider your pitiful existence. Expecting them to share an entrance would be unfair.
Souce

These people share the same doors every day. Low- and middle- income people work in the same buildings as the wealthy. They are custodial and security staff, admin assistants and file clerks; they make sure the building were these rich people work run. To think you can’t walk though the same door in the building you live is crazy.

thepeoplesrecord:

NYC approves apartment building with separate entrance for the poor
July 23, 2014

It would be difficult to come with a more on-the-nose metaphor for New York City’s income inequality problem than the new high-rise apartment building coming to 40 Riverside Boulevard, which will feature separate doors for regular, wealthy humans and whatever you call the scum that rents affordable housing.

Extell Development Company, the firm behind the new building, announced its intentions to segregate the rich and poor to much outrage last year. Fifty-five of the luxury complex’s 219 units would be marked for low-income renters—netting some valuable tax breaks for Extell—with the caveat that the less fortunate tenants would stick to their own entrance.

The city’s Department of Housing Preservation and Development approved Extell’s Inclusionary Housing Program application for the 33-story tower this week, the New York Post reports. The status grants Extell the aforementioned tax breaks and the right to construct a larger building than would ordinarily be allowed. According to the Daily Mailaffordable housing tenants will enter through a door situated on a “back alley.”

Any of the unwashed folk who complain about such a convenient arrangement, of course, are just being ungrateful. As the Mail points out, fellow poor-door developer David Von Spreckelsenexplained as much last year:

"No one ever said that the goal was full integration of these populations," said David Von Spreckelsen, senior vice president at Toll Brothers. "So now you have politicians talking about that, saying how horrible those back doors are. I think it’s unfair to expect very high-income homeowners who paid a fortune to live in their building to have to be in the same boat as low-income renters, who are very fortunate to live in a new building in a great neighborhood."

In these economically fraught times, it’s easy to forget that the super rich earned their right to never see you, hear you, smell you, or consider your pitiful existence. Expecting them to share an entrance would be unfair.

Souce

These people share the same doors every day. Low- and middle- income people work in the same buildings as the wealthy. They are custodial and security staff, admin assistants and file clerks; they make sure the building were these rich people work run. To think you can’t walk though the same door in the building you live is crazy.

— 1 week ago with 1085 notes
socialismartnature:


Breaking via ABC News: UN Human Rights Council votes to open inquiry into alleged war crimes in Gaza; U.S. is the ONLY “no” vote.
That’s because the U.S. is a direct accomplice to every war crime that Israel commits.


Can we talk about all of Western Europe abstaining? Nice avoidance. I think it’s almost worse than the US voting no. Take a fucking stand.

socialismartnature:

Breaking via ABC News: UN Human Rights Council votes to open inquiry into alleged war crimes in Gaza; U.S. is the ONLY “no” vote.

That’s because the U.S. is a direct accomplice to every war crime that Israel commits.

Can we talk about all of Western Europe abstaining? Nice avoidance. I think it’s almost worse than the US voting no. Take a fucking stand.

(Source: twitter.com, via thepeoplesrecord)

— 1 week ago with 25030 notes

onlyblackgirl:

The history of film in one scene

(Source: frankoceanvevo, via katiereallylovesthings)

— 1 week ago with 169100 notes
vintagegal:


Tattooed Lady photographed for National Geographic, 1931 (via)

vintagegal:

Tattooed Lady photographed for National Geographic, 1931 (via)

(via whotrekkie)

— 1 week ago with 16547 notes
thepeoplesrecord:

"I’d like to raise both of my middle fingers to him and anyone who thinks profanity is somehow more harmful to our children than images of violence and misogyny." - Happy birthday, M.I.A.!

thepeoplesrecord:

"I’d like to raise both of my middle fingers to him and anyone who thinks profanity is somehow more harmful to our children than images of violence and misogyny." - Happy birthday, M.I.A.!

— 1 week ago with 16784 notes
"They tell us that prisons are over-populated. But what if it was the population that was being over-imprisoned?"
Michel Foucault || A statement on French prisons (1971)

(Source: fourteendrawings, via angry-hippo)

— 1 week ago with 5718 notes