Revenge & You

nprfreshair:

Dr. Martin Blaser is an expert on the human microbiome, which is the collection of bacteria, viruses, fungi and other microbes that live in and on the body. In fact, about 70 to 90 percent of all the cells in the human body aren’t human at all — they’re micro-organisms. 
Blaser is the author of Missing Microbes, and speculates that overuse of antibiotics causes food allergies, asthma, and intestinal disorders.
If antibiotics are wiping out these micro-organisms, then probiotics are putting some of them back in. 
Here’s what Dr. Blaser says about the use of probiotics: 

"There are many different probiotics. If you go to the grocery store, the health food store, the drugstore, there are shelves and shelves full of probiotics [with] different names, different compositions. I think I can say three things: The first is that they’re almost completely unregulated; second is that they seem to be generally safe; and third is that they’re mostly untested about the important reasons that people even want to take probiotics because they don’t feel well or they have particular symptoms …
Right now, it’s the Wild West. I’m actually a big believer in probiotics; I think that’s going to be part of the future of medicine, that we’re going to understand the science of the microbiome well enough so that we can look at a sample from a child and say this child is lacking such-and-such an organism and now we’re going to take it off the shelf and we’re going to give it back to that child … Just as today the kids are lining up for the vaccines, in the future, maybe the kids are going to be drinking certain organisms so that we can replace the ones that they’ve lost.”

nprfreshair:

Dr. Martin Blaser is an expert on the human microbiome, which is the collection of bacteria, viruses, fungi and other microbes that live in and on the body. In fact, about 70 to 90 percent of all the cells in the human body aren’t human at all — they’re micro-organisms. 

Blaser is the author of Missing Microbes, and speculates that overuse of antibiotics causes food allergies, asthma, and intestinal disorders.

If antibiotics are wiping out these micro-organisms, then probiotics are putting some of them back in. 

Here’s what Dr. Blaser says about the use of probiotics: 

"There are many different probiotics. If you go to the grocery store, the health food store, the drugstore, there are shelves and shelves full of probiotics [with] different names, different compositions. I think I can say three things: The first is that they’re almost completely unregulated; second is that they seem to be generally safe; and third is that they’re mostly untested about the important reasons that people even want to take probiotics because they don’t feel well or they have particular symptoms …

Right now, it’s the Wild West. I’m actually a big believer in probiotics; I think that’s going to be part of the future of medicine, that we’re going to understand the science of the microbiome well enough so that we can look at a sample from a child and say this child is lacking such-and-such an organism and now we’re going to take it off the shelf and we’re going to give it back to that child … Just as today the kids are lining up for the vaccines, in the future, maybe the kids are going to be drinking certain organisms so that we can replace the ones that they’ve lost.”

(via we-are-star-stuff)

— 1 day ago with 276 notes

Mean Girls cast on the possibility of a reunion x

(via feynificent)

— 2 days ago with 1908 notes

awkwardsituationist:

light pollution is largely the result poorly designed lighting, which wastes energy shining outward to the sky, where it is unwanted, instead of downwards to the ground, where it is needed. billions are spent each year on unshielded outdoor lights, though they are directly responsible for 14.7 million tons of carbon dioxide waste in the u.s. alone.

our overlit cities and suburbs have radically altered the light rhythms to which many forms of life, including diurnal animals such as ourselves, have adapted, disrupting the migratory, reproductive and feeding cycles of nocturnal creatures in potentially devastating ways.

light, for example, makes nocturnal animals easier prey, and acts as a magnet for birds, with the latter effect so powerful that scientists speak of some birds being literally “captured” by searchlights, circling in the thousands until they drop. the effect was notably observed in new york’s tribute of lights.

the effect on humans is just as profound. darkness is not only essential to our biological welfare (with light pollution linked to breast and prostate cancer), but the light of the stars and the rhythms of day and night is part our collective evolutionary and cultural patrimony. yet, two thirds of humanity live under skies polluted with light, while one fifth of the planet can no longer see the milky way.

photos by jim richardson from his series “death of night,” to consider during earth hour, which is saturday, march 29 at 8:30pm.

(via we-are-star-stuff)

— 2 weeks ago with 6200 notes